Noah Yap Tells Post-Drug Abuse Story In Film, But Doesn’t Actually Play Himself


Noah Yap Tells His Story To Caution Youth Against Drug Abuse

The reel world often imitates real-life onscreen. When a real-life story inspires a film in return, that’s a tale worth telling.

Actor Noah Yap of Ah Boys To Men fame previously made headlines when he was found to have abused the drug cannabis while serving his National Service in 2016. He was sentenced to 9 months in SAF’s detention barracks, the army equivalent of jail.

Definitely not the best lobang he had.

But against all odds, Noah Yap has returned to the silver screen in the recent movie, Ah Boys To Men 4.

To commemorate his success in turning his life around, FLY Entertainment released a short film entitled Chances, based on the actor’s real-life struggles after completing his sentence.

Except, it was extremely odd that Noah Yap did not actually play as Noah Yap in the film about Noah Yap. Even the protagonist’s best friend – named Keith – is played by Maxi Lim who is Noah Yap’s ACTUAL friend.

…I can’t play as myself

Puzzling. But we’ll let his fans figure out why after watching the film here. We’ve summarised the key points after the jump.

An alternate setting but similar storyline

The story begins with the protagonist – Joseph Yap – being released from prison back into society where he is once again free to rebuild his life.

Do note that we assume that Joseph presumably represents Noah. But then again, we’re not sure why they kept his surname.


Joseph meets his parents and best friend Maxi Lim Keith, who decides to document Joseph’s journey back to normalcy from start to finish.

Upon reaching home, Joseph being a filial child, does not wish to disappoint his loving parents further. He struggles to tell his parents about the truth regarding his non-existent basketball training and resorts to lying to them.

He sets new #goals, include striving to secure a place in a new basketball team.

Where did I hear that line before?

However, in a series of rejections playing out as a montage, Joseph gets denied entry to every basketball team he tries out for due to his history of drug abuse.


In a flashback dream sequence, the film then climaxes at Joseph’s memories of being caught for abusing drugs.

Wait Rosie Phua is a police officer now?

Literally waking up from his living nightmare, Joseph seeks comfort from his supportive mother. Who, for plot-device reasons, chose to withhold the extremely important fact that her son’s future was literally on hold in an important phone call.

In the end Joseph’s perseverance pays off as he was finally accepted into the team he first applied for.

Despite the slightly cliché and cringy storyline, this parable was meant as a parallel to Noah Yap’s true story. The message was also undoubtedly clear.

Recovering from being convicted for drug abuse – or any crime in fact – can be a true struggle.

But that is the reality that many ex-drug abusers have to deal with when they are allowed back into society.

Noah Yap’s message to persons-at-risk

In the final minutes of this short film, we see the real Noah Yap get featured onscreen as he begins his heartfelt message.

Apologising to his fans, Noah thanks them for their unwavering support that has helped him through his post-drug recovery period.

He finally ends off with a message to all potential and current drug users to “say no to drugs”.

Generally, the film has been taken positively. With many netizens commending Noah Yap for being sincere in admitting his mistakes and turning his life around. However, some unfortunately saw this as a publicity stunt for his movie.

But we think credit should be given to where it’s due. For what it’s worth, it takes a fair amount of courage to put yourself out there to admit your mistakes to the public.

All things considered, Noah definitely did a mighty fine job for his newest lobang – as a survivor of the war against drugs.

Featured image from Facebook.




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