OCS Introduces Safety Stoppage Card To Reduce ‘Power Gap’ Between Cadets & Commanders

Over recent years, the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) has reported several training-related incidents that led to injuries, and in some instances, even death.

In what seems like an attempt to address concerns arising from these incidents, the Officer Cadet School, Singapore (OCS) recently uploaded a video on its Facebook page sharing a new safety feature that it has introduced.

Aptly named the Safety Stoppage Card (SSC), this allows cadets to pause training to voice out any safety concerns.

OCS cadets to flash SSC when they spot safety breaches

According to the video, OCS cadets are allowed to raise the SSC whenever they spot unsafe practices or breaches in the Safety Management Plan which may cause injuries.

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Once the card is raised, the “Conducting Body” has to stop the activities immediately and address the concerns before allowing training to resume.

The SSC is reportedly issued to each cadet at the start of Common Leadership Module and is to be placed in the Commander’s Bag.

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When training outfield, the SSC also accompanies the cadet and has to be placed in their integrated Load Bearing Vest (iLBV) or Load Bearing System (LBS).

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OCS aims to “reduce the power distance” between trainees and instructors using the SSC.

Instances of how it’s to be used

OCS also shared instances of how the card is to be used in the video.

In the first example, the commander orders a group of cadets to conduct temperature taking and water parade by themselves as he’s “busy with stores”.

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As the commander walks away, one cadet raises the SSC, saying that it’s a “NO GO”. He subsequently explained that both activities have to be done under supervision.

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Another scenario shown includes prolonged Combat Circuit without adequate rest intervals.

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Netizens share thoughts on Safety Stoppage Card

By and large, netizens reacted positively to the initiative with many applauding the OCS’ attempt at making its training safer.

One netizen, however, pointed out how the raising of the card reminded him of the referee in a football match.

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Some questioned the need for the card when cadets could just voice out when they observe a safety breach.

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This netizen explained the distinction in his concise post.

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Thoughts on SSC?

Regardless of your views on the initiative, the SSC shows that safety is a value that the OCS, as well as the SAF, take seriously.

While no system is perfect and flawless, we hope the SSC will encourage cadets to speak up when they spot any safety breaches.

What are your thoughts on the SSC? Share your thoughts and ideas on how to improve it in the comments below.

Featured image adapted from Facebook