Super Typhoon Hagibis Is Strongest Storm Ever Since 1958, Expected To Hit Japan On 12 Oct

On Friday (11 Oct), news splashed across the world giving warnings of a super typhoon – with winds hitting up to 180km/h – that will hit Japan today (12 Oct).

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Typhoon Hagibis will be one of the biggest storms to terrorise the country and could potentially match Typhoon Kanogawa from 1958,  which killed 1,200 people.

Situation in Japan’s supermarkets

With ample warnings given to Japanese citizens, many have flocked to supermarkets to stock up on food supplies.

However, instead of seeing an abundance of items, the sight of empty shelves greet those who were presumably late to the game.

Empty shelves in a Japanese supermaket
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Food items such as instant noodles and mineral water bottles are almost completely swept off the shelves, as seen in pictures below.

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Other items such as raw meat and seafood have also been cleared as locals are most likely anticipating being stuck at home for an indefinite period once Typhoon Hagibis strikes.

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A couple of posts on Twitter also mentioned that bread was among the items that were the fastest to sell out.

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Skies allegedly turn pink in Japan

In light of the impending disaster, people in Japan are reportedly seeing purple and pink skies across the country.

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Even though such pictures are circulating around Twitter, we are unable to ascertain whether they are authentic as Japanese media have yet to cover this phenomenon at the time of writing.

Here are some pictures that are currently being widely discussed about online.

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At Universal Studios Japan in Osaka
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The hashtag #PrayForJapan is currently trending as well with these pictures.

Meanwhile, a clip uploaded to Twitter 4 hours ago showing torrential rain pouring down buildings in Ichihara.

Super typhoon’s latest status

According to The Japan Times, transport operators as well as supermarkets in Japan plan to seize or minimise operations today (12 Oct) due to Typhoon Hagibis.

This means major railway services such as shinkansen – bullet trains in Japanese – and JR lines are majorly affected.

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The Japan Meteorological Agency has issued an emergency warning for landslides in Tokyo and Izu, Shizuoka Prefecture.

2 matches of the Rugby World Cup will be cancelled and the qualifying race for the 2019 Japanese Grand Prix will be postponed to Sunday (13 Oct) morning.

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Formula 1 has also taken measures to deal with the threat of the storm. You can find out more here.

Residents advised to take precautionary steps

Meanwhile, Mr Shigeo Kannaka, a director of Japan Bosai (Disaster Prevention) Society, has advised people to fill their bathtubs, kettles and buckets with water so that they can use them in the event of water supply disruption.

He also said that flashlights, portable radios, and smartphones will also come in handy in the event of a power failure.

Other safety precautions include taping windows, stocking up on food & water as well as topping up car gas.

Japan circled in red
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This is an actual photo of Typhoon Hagibis approaching Japan. It looks massive and devastating.

Praying for Japan

With the super typhoon set to hit Japan soon, we’re praying that Japan has more than enough to equip themselves with the right precautionary and recovery measures.

If you’re currently in Japan, you might want to consider keeping a close eye on this Reddit thread for disaster advisories and resources.

#PrayForJapan
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Even though destruction is most likely inevitable, let’s all hope everyone are able to stay warm and safe from the storm.

Featured image adapted from Twitter and Twitter.