Schools Continue Testing Students With Respiratory Symptoms For Covid-19

As many students return to school amidst the Covid-19 pandemic, concerns about their safety have rightfully surfaced.

This, especially after 5 cases emerged among schools within the first week of reopening.

In a further step to reassure the public, the Ministry of Education (MOE) has extended swab tests to more students and staff.

1,600 students tested for Covid-19, more to go

Education Minister Ong Ye Kung shared on Facebook today (13 Jun) that 1,600 students have been swabbed since the extension of tests on 2 Jun.

Since the thought of having a long cotton bud up your nose may be intimidating, Mr Ong tries to reassure students that it’s totally fine.

He explains in his caption that,

It is a bit uncomfortable, but really not too bad, as this young girl shows us.

Indeed, despite the apparent discomfort, the young student sat through the quick swab test without so much as a flinch. If she can do that, why can’t the rest of us?

Swab tests for staff & students with respiratory symptoms

According to a press release on 7 Jun, schools have begun testing staff and students over the age of 12 who have Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) symptoms.

Prior to this, only students aged 12 and below had to take the Covid-19 swab tests.

Source

With wider testing, MOE hopes to detect cases early so they can take the necessary actions fast for the sake of everyone’s safety.

By isolating Covid-19 patients early, they can prevent infections in school and keep it a safe space for all.

More tests on the way for those with symptoms

It has been some time since the figures were provided, so there’s a chance the numbers have risen by now.

Keeping that in mind, we thus shouldn’t be surprised if more local cases emerge. From past reports, we should know that more vigorous testing usually equates to more cases detected.

Hopefully, with early detection, those infected will be able to receive the treatment they need, and schools can stop the virus from transmitting. That way, staff and students can return to school and resume their routines with peace of mind.

Featured image adapted from Facebook.