One youth even wanted join ISIS in Syria

Still think that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is something that affects only Iraq and Syria? Think again.

The Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) announced today (27 May) that two teens were arrested under the Internal Security Act (ISA) for terrorism-related activities.

Both youths were self-radicalized via terrorist propaganda online.

M Arifil Azim Putra Norja’i, 19, actively researched methods to travel to Syria and join the war. Failing that, he also looked for ways to create improvised explosive devices to carry out attacks in Singapore. Key installations and government leaders were targeted, all with the goal to destabilize Singapore.

Arifil tried to recruit peers, who remained unswayed but did not report these attempts to the Police. Thankfully, someone (who remains unknown) managed to spot Arifil’s behavioural changes, and notified the authorities.

The other youth, aged 17, is under arrest for further investigations to determine the extent of his self-radicalization.

Singapore isn’t safe from ISIS. And we’re not just sensationalizing

“But he didn’t actually do anything!”

“Stop making a mountain out of a molehill!”

“Singapore so safe, don’t any how blow up the small things la” (Pun intended)

Hang on. Allow us to remind you that Jemaah Islamiyah (JI) members were arrested in 2001 for PLANNING to attack MRT stations and embassies.

This guy PLANNED to join ISIS in Syria and also PLANNED to attack domestic facilities.

Where does terrorism actually start? It begins with the idea, not with the act.

f2707a2deaac8c9385ce9703ebda3ced (1)Warners Bros. Pictures / Source

Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean said in July 2014 that Singaporeans have already been confirmed to have joined the conflict in Syria. So while the physical war may be waged halfway round the world, the mental battle begins right here.

Meanwhile, let’s just thank our stars that authorities here are competent enough to nip the problem before any lives are lost.


Featured Image via Cliparts.co / Wikimedia
With references from Ministry of Home Affairs