Workers’ Dormitory Cases Needs To Decrease To Prevent “Spillover”

As of Monday (4 May), Singapore still has 4 more weeks to go before the end of the ‘Circuit Breaker’ (CB).

Though so, we are still seeing large jumps in the number of Covid-19 cases. Many of which continue to involve worker living in dormitories.

S’pore Reports 573 New Covid-19 Cases On 4 May, 5 Are S’poreans & PRs

In a parliamentary session earlier today, Health Minister Gan Kim Yong states that a fall in migrant worker dorm cases is one of the crucial factors in deciding when the CB can be lifted.

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Number of workers’ dormitory cases must decrease too

On Monday (4 May), the Ministry of Health (MOH) confirmed another 573 Covid-19 cases, of which 99% involve Work Permit holders living in dormitories.

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Despite an evident fall in community spread, the situation in workers’ dormitories remains challenging, with several hundred new cases daily.

According to Mr Gan, it is “equally important”  to witness a decrease in workers’ dormitory cases – compared to community cases – before lifting the CB measures

This is to ensure we do not put continue putting ourselves “at risk of a spillover” of Covid-19 cases from dormitories into the community.

Community cases also need to hit single digits

Other than a decrease in workers’ dormitories cases, Singapore would also have to consider two other factors before lifting the CB.

Firstly, community cases have to decrease to single digits – zero if possible – over a prolonged period of time.

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Progress must also be seen internationally before Singapore reopens its borders once again, says Minister Gan.

Hope to see new cases coming down

It might seem like a long road ahead, but it is heartening to see the government taking careful steps in controlling the pandemic here in Singapore.

Undoubtedly, we are seeing diminishing numbers of cases as we adhere to CB measures implemented by the government.

We hope to see numbers, community or not, decrease in the weeks to come. That way, we can return to our pre-CB life go about our usual meet-ups with family and friends.

Featured image adapted from Facebook.