Singapore Temperatures Have Increased By 0.29°C Each Year, Could See 40°C Weather By 2045

If you thought the sweltering heat has been unbearable of late, we have some really bad news.

Singapore could experience 40°C weather as soon as 2045, as reported by TODAY‘s article about a climate simulation report by the Meteorological Service of Singapore on Friday (5 Jul).

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But don’t sweat just yet.

There just might be a way to prevent a heat apocalypse from happening on our sunny island, if everyone is cooperative.

40°C weather in Singapore as early as 2045

According to simulations run by the Centre for Climate Research Singapore, the 40°C weather will not just be a “one-off event”, claim experts.

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Scientists say that 40°C temperatures were reported during the simulation on several days starting from 2045.

This is the ‘worst case scenario’ if our societies around the world continue to emit greenhouse gases like Carbon Dioxide and Methane at the current rate.

Other models saw ‘better’ results, suggesting that the phenomenon could be delayed until after 2065.

Singapore has gotten warmer by 0.29°C per year on average

Like most places on Earth, Singapore has gotten warmer over recent years.

While we may not experience extreme heatwaves like those recently seen across Europe – not forgetting the 39.5°C Hokkaido heatwave – temperatures have been increasing steadily. More accurately, by 0.29°C per year, for the past 4 decades.

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One climate scientist even pointed out that our ‘coolest month’ now is as hot as our ‘warmest month’ back in the 1970s.

Cut down on our carbon footprint

While we may have chosen to ignore climate change warnings in the past, the worrying results of this simulation is certainly a rallying call for Singaporeans to cut down on our carbon footprint.

40°C weather may already sound intolerable, but we hope this simulation doesn’t come to pass in Singapore.

Perhaps that’s why there’s never been a more pressing need for a workable Carbon Tax on corporations emitting gases which may contribute to global warming.

But is there more that can be done to encourage Singaporeans to cut down on their carbon footprints? Share your suggestions in the comments below.

Featured image from Medium and SGAG.