Inbound Australia Travellers To Undergo Compulsory 14-Day Self-Quarantine

As Covid-19 cases continue to rise worldwide, countries are stepping up containment measures to protect public safety.

While Italy and France imposed lockdowns, Australia has issued a compulsory 14-day self-quarantine today (15 Mar) for all incoming travellers.

The emergency move will start at midnight, according to Channel NewsAsia (CNA).

Self-quarantine to contain Covid-19 spread in Australia

Travel bans on visitors from virus hotspots are rational steps to reduce risk of contagion, but Australia is taking extra precautions.

As a result, with effect from Monday (16 Mar), anyone entering the country has to self-quarantine upon arrival.

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This means that they have to stay indoors at all times over the next 14 days and monitor their health closely.

According to CNA, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said that people will have to adjust to these drastic changes in lifestyle.

One of these changes will have to be handshakes, he said — just days after he was seen going for one.

Violating self-quarantine in Australia is an offence

Citing a scenario of someone returning from Bali and reporting to work, he added that such an action counts as an offence.

Whether the offence is criminal or punishable is unclear.

However, if Australia is as strict as Singapore, anyone who violates quarantine orders will likely risk facing punishment.

Total ban on cruise ships

Perhaps in light of wild Covid-19 spreads on cruise ships like the Diamond Princess, Australia is also banning them completely.

With the new regulations, the country expects much slower visitor traffic in the coming days.

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Though strict, these measures are necessary for them to keep the Covid-19 situation under control, especially after reporting 269 cases.

Since the majority of these cases are visitors from the United States, Australia’s urgency to monitor travellers is understandable.

We hope the new measures will be effective, and help contain the viral spread in Australia.

Featured image adapted from Marcus Wong on Flickr.