Blue Flower Field In Japan Offers One Of The Country’s Best Views

While countries around the world are slowly easing their lockdown measures, it’ll be a while before any of us can start dreaming of going on overseas trips again.

In light of the Covid-19 pandemic, lots of people had to cancel their Spring travel plans.

That’s probably what made this Facebook post about a ethereal blue flower field in Japan go viral, garnering 11,000 shares in just over a week.

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Dreamy blue flower field in Japan go viral

Anyone would understand why these flourishing fields were so widely shared — they’re just gorgeous!

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The never-ending blue periwinkle fields against the azure sky and cottony clouds instantly take our breaths away.

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If you’re wondering, the fields are apparently located at Hitachi Seaside Park (ひたち海浜公園) in Ibaraki prefecture. According to Japan Web Magazine, the scenery there is known as one of Japan’s best views.

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They even have a windmill, making for the perfect postcard scene.

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The 3.8-hectare field is packed with 4.5 million stalks of Nemophila — also known as ‘Baby Blue Eyes’.

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The adjacent pink sakura trees in full bloom also add a nice contrast to the flowers, turning it into a pastel haven.

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Festival cancelled due to Covid-19

Usually, the flower field draws millions of visitors during the Nemophila Harmony festival, held from late April to early May — right about now.

Unfortunately, the festival had to be cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

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Though none of us will be able to enjoy the baby blue view in person this year, at least the flowers are still intact and weren’t razed like another Japanese tulip field.

Next year’s travel plans settled, hopefully

Since we can’t hop on a plane to visit the lush fields now, we’ll have to save it for next year’s travel plans — or whenever it is safe for us to travel again.

The Covid-19 pandemic has brought many of our lives to a standstill, but these flowers remind us of the bright future that awaits us once we’re over the hurdle.

Hopefully, some of us will get to see these beautiful blooms in person next year, but until then, we’d have to contend with these pictures.

Featured image adapted from Facebook